Webeden Blog Archive New .XXX Domain Name Extension in the pipeline

New .XXX Domain Name Extension in the pipeline

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What’s your favourite domain name extension? Have you opted for the .co.uk? Or are you a fan of the web’s biggest domain, the .com. What about one of the new domain extensions such as .biz or .info?

Well if you’re a fan of domain names then you might be excited to hear that there’s a new one on the way – the .XXX. But before you rush out and buy one beware: this is for adult content only!

The Internet’s governing body – the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) recently approved the new .XXX domain but will restrict it to ‘adult content’ Web sites.

ICANN have been chewing this over for a decade but gave it final approval at its annual meeting in San Francisco in March, voting 9-3 to approve the domain.

There’s actually quite a few governments, including the U.S., opposed the creation of the domains. And surprisingly, the Free Speech Coalition, which represents some of the adult industry, were also against it.

Perhaps the only ones to profit will be those selling the new domain extension – thought to cost $60 each.

And no, WebEden will not be offering the .XXX for sale!

What do you think – a good idea because it clearly marks out adults sites? Or is this just another money making exercise for ICANN and the registrars? Leave us a comment below.

  • http://twitter.com/RalliSolicitors Ralli

    From a legal point of view trade mark owners not in the adult industry can assert their word marks and apply to block a third party registering a XXX domain name which includes their own word mark with any “negative” results that may follow on.

    Thereafter the second stage is a landrush period from 8th November to 25th November followed by a final stage of general availability from 6th December.

    If you are in the adult entertainment industry or another adult industry then clearly it’s in your interests to apply for registration but if not then what’s the issue? Well you don’t need to apply to register a XXX domain yourself as that may have “negative” results for you but the viable alternative of applying to block third party registration means the XXX domain is not available or “reserved for use” for life of the domain.

    The commercial advantage of the application to block is that for a relatively small one off fee you do not then have the time and cost of having to bring litigation or invoking the domain dispute resolution procedure post third party registration.